Cosmetic Surgery Nursing

Cosmetic Surgery Nursing

From Botox to laser tattoo removal

By Christine Contillo, RN, BSN
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I always applaud the entrepreneurial spirit of ambitious nurses, but when I read an article about nurses administering Botox and using lasers to remove tattoos, I wondered if these were legitimate career possibilities that I’d left unexplored. I wondered if the Nurse Practice Act has anything to say about this and found out that the California Medical Board has a lot to say. Their website has a series of questions and answers about this very topic. I’m not one to sit back and let another profession tell me how I should practice nursing, but we do have to understand the limits of what our license permits and not take on unwanted liability. Only physicians and licensed nurses under their supervision may perform these treatments or procedures. A nurse may not begin a private medical cosmetic practice or practice at a spa without physician supervision.

Interestingly enough, “Botox parties” are permitted, as long as a physician is on-site. The board doesn’t specify where the procedures need to take place. Maybe you feel comfortable with free consults in your friend’s kitchen, but for a cosmetic procedure costing me hundreds of dollars, I think I’d rather be in an office.

Two websites offer some insight into the cosmetic surgery culture. BeautyBlog.com blurs the relationship between blog and advertising. It claims to allow readers access to the Botox experience from experienced bloggers, but I noticed that one of the writers is actually stumping for her husband’s cosmetic practice. He has his own website, which has a price list for a wide variety of procedures, and allows you to watch a tattoo removal. A more even-handed evaluation of various procedures can be found at RealSelf.com.

Did they win me over? Not yet, but then maybe I’d feel differently if this column included a before-and-after photograph or two!

Christine Contillo RN, BSN, has worked as a nurse since 1979 and has written extensively for various nursing publications, as well as The New York Times.

This article is from workingnurse.com.

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