Men in Nursing

Working Nurse 2020 – Critical Care, Erik Rodarte, Huntington Hospital, Pasadena

Looking back on this year, what have been the biggest changes in your practice?

Being on the front lines has made me hypervigilant about infection control, both inside and outside of the hospital. Social interaction with patients and their families has always been an important part of my patient care, but it has become challenging, since families are unable to visit. I set aside time during my shift for Zoom calls to make sure patients have a chance to see their loved ones.

Tell us about the most inspirational thing you’ve experienced as a nurse during this pandemic.

Seeing our unit leadership team front and center was inspiring, providing a human, personal touch in the midst of a very isolating experience. Our leadership has been completely transparent about our PPE supplies and current plans for managing COVID-19 patient surge while making us feel valued and heard.

What nonmedical support from family, friends or the general public has been most appreciated?

During the lockdowns, my family and I remained in contact with FaceTime calls. I particularly enjoy calls from my nieces and nephew as well as the occasional happy hour call with friends. I have received so much appreciation from family members, friends and neighbors in forms of thank-you cards, care packages and meals. It makes all I do well worth it.

Nursing Education

How have you grown as a nurse since you started working in this profession?

Since becoming a critical care nurse, I have grown more passionate about the impact I can have in someone’s life. I am humbled to be able to share tears of joy with a family member when their loved one is doing better; bring comfort with a phone call to an anxious daughter who cannot visit her hospitalized mother; or hold the hand of a dying patient.

Read the full Men in Nursing 2020 article here.


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